Seabirds and Butterflies
"We real cool. We
Left school. We
Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We
Sing sin. We
Thin gin. We
Jazz June. We
Die soon."
— Gwendolyn Brooks

Bobbie.21. Viscous.
Notes
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Valerie, the first Black female cartoon character on a regular Saturday morning cartoon.

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Valerie, the first Black female cartoon character on a regular Saturday morning cartoon.

Notes

Anne Elizabeth Moore (via conscientious)

i could not agree more. “edgy” as a marketing ploy can be used for so much as of late, it’s heartbreaking.

(via jesuisperdu)

“Vice is, however, “edgy” as a marketing ploy, following an utterly predictable strategy to afford loud, mostly white, mostly dudes yet more license in culture to act out at will, to acclaim but little consequence. In practical terms, as any cursory search of the content at Vice.com will show, “edgy” means “racist” and “sexist”—sometimes by accident, although often not.”
Notes
Notes

flagg0t:

If someone tells you to listen to a song, listen to it.  It may be the worst song you have ever heard but they wanted to share it with you.  That is really special.  If it makes them feel a certain way and they are so adamant about you hearing it, take 5 minutes to hear it.  It shows a lot about someone.  

Notes

nprradiopictures:

selektormagazine:

Cody Cobb

That last one feels particularly on point with weather in D.C. today. -Emily

Notes
Notes

The concern for overly exposed young bodies may be well-intentioned. With society fetishizing girls at younger and younger ages, girls are instructed to self-objectify and see themselves as sexual objects, something to be looked at. A laundry list of problems can come from obsessing over one’s appearance: eating disorders, depression, low self-worth. Who wouldn’t want to spare her daughter from these struggles?

But these dress codes fall short of being legitimately helpful. What we fail to consider when enforcing restrictions on skirt-length and the tightness of pants is the girls themselves—not just their clothes, but their thoughts, emotions, budding sexuality and self-image.

Instead, these restrictions are executed with distracted boys in mind, casting girls as inherent sexual threats needing to be tamed. Dress restrictions in schools contribute to the very problem they aim to solve: the objectification of young girls. When you tell a girl what to wear (or force her to cover up with an oversized T-shirt), you control her body. When you control a girl’s body—even if it is ostensibly for her “own good”—you take away her agency. You tell her that her body is not her own.

When you deem a girl’s dress “inappropriate,” you’re also telling her, “Because your body may distract boys, your body is inappropriate. Cover it up.” You recontextualize her body; she now exists through the male gaze.

Notes
“I think we still live in a culture that assumes that men are single by choice and women are single because no one wants them.”
Notes
Junot Diaz (via luciaferr)
“I think the average guy thinks they’re pro-woman, just because they think they’re a nice guy and someone has told them that they’re awesome. But the truth is far from it. Unless you are actively, consciously working against the gravitational pull of the culture, you will predictably, thematically, create these sort of fucked-up representations.”
Notes

lameborghini:

straight boys…..please let me fix ur eyebrows..i can help u……

Notes
studioafrica:

Flaviana Matata: Pic(k)s from the Portfolio

studioafrica:

Flaviana Matata: Pic(k)s from the Portfolio

Notes
de-bra:

Andy Dixon, Still Life With Watermelon. 

de-bra:

Andy Dixon, Still Life With Watermelon. 

Notes

Sally Kempton

I feel this is very important.

(via yourenotsylviaplath)

why do you think they’re so scared?

(via steelfemme)

“When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women.”
Notes
S